Local children’s charity thrilled with life-changing Christmas gift from Global’s Make Some Noise.

Nottingham-based charity, Footprints CEC, is the lucky recipient of a generous donation to improve online communication primarily with families affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. Thanks to a Global’s Make Some [...]

Nottingham-based charity, Footprints CEC, is the lucky recipient of a generous donation to improve online communication primarily with families affected by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Thanks to a Global’s Make Some Noise grant, Footprints received £21,000 to upgrade their I.T. systems and train staff in remote service provision.

The charity, which provides Conductive Education sessions for children with mobility or communication difficulties across the East Midlands, and a support network for the families, have experienced significant challenges in delivering online sessions since the health crisis began as many children needed to ‘shield’.

Footprints decided to close its doors even earlier than the national lockdown date due to the vulnerability and complex needs of children who attend. As much of their funding was reliant on providing face-to-face Conductive Education sessions with children, they were placed in a precarious position, no longer delivering on objectives.

Fifty-percent of their education staff were placed on furlough, meaning that the remaining team had the full burden of supporting families without the technical know-how and appropriate equipment.

Manager, Nathalie Bailey-Flitter, said:

“To be able to function fully and provide seamless support for families is important to us. During the lockdown, we were fortunate to receive funding to start online Zoom classes that our Conductors embraced as well as they could. However, our outdated systems and internet capabilities are insufficient and unable to cope with the demands we want to place on them

“Our biggest concern is being able to consistently provide the right support at the right time for our families. Missing a few school sessions is not the same as missing a few Conductive Education sessions for our children – it’s the difference between eating and drinking safely, communicating wants and needs, learning to grasp, sit- up, roll over or walk.

“Conductive Education builds new neural pathways in the brain, and this is done through repetition, using the group’s motivation. Each time a session is missed, progress is delayed – it takes so much longer for each child to learn how to master the activities we take for granted. These children (and their families) need continuous access to our regular weekly support.

The Funding from Global’s Make Some Noise scheme allows the charity to ‘Covid-proof’ their service. It helps ensure that children who cannot attend in person, can still join in from home with a parent or guardian and benefit from ongoing support, which is vital to maintain life skills.

“Footprints are a unique and vital service. One year after diagnosis, this is the one I cannot live without as a parent…

 

 

 

 

Ends

Notes to editors:

To find out more about Global’s Make Some Noise please visit https://www.makesomenoise.com/

For further information about the project, please contact nathalie.bailey-flitter@footprintscec.orgemma-jane.graham@footprintscec.org or Eileen Sleaford on 07553400973 eileen.sleaford@footprintscec.org

If you would like to support the charity, you can donate to its Keep Footprints Afloat campaign: http://bit.ly/KeepFootprintsAfloat

About Footprints CEC

www.footprintscec.org 

Footprints currently support 60 families and must raise a minimum of £17,000 a month through voluntary donations to survive.

Founded by a group of parents in 1981, Footprints CEC’s mission is to provide Conductive Education and other services to help children with mobility and communication problems develop the skills they need to thrive and achieve their potential. It is committed to creating a safe, positive, supportive and fun environment where parents receive practical assistance, information and training to help them support their child in their own home.

 

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